Tag Archives: dogwalker

The Best Eco-Friendly Poop Bags: Earth Rated Poop Bags (PRODUCT REVIEW)

Lori Waters

Lori Waters

Animal Expert Extraordinaire! at The Litter Sitter, inc.
Lori Waters is the author and voice behind Thee Inside Poop as well as the owner and operator of The Litter Sitter, a local dog walking and pet sitting company in Miami Beach, FL. When she's not busy blogging and taking care of clients' pets you can find her running around with her german shepherd Zoey or having in-depth conversations with her two fur balls, Michi and Oakley!
Lori Waters

Poop bags

When my husband and I first got Zoey I went through a number of poop bags in search of the perfect one! During my first few months of looking for the right bag I was highly influenced and swayed by all of the cute and colorful poop bags and dispensers found at local pet stores. The ones with intricate designs and patterns (little bones, paw prints, flowers, etc) or bright and fun colors were the ones I was attracted to the most but as time progressed, more specifically after I opened up my dog walking business and started picking up tons of poop, I realized I needed something a little more eco-friendly!

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Collar Types – Which One Is Best For My Dog!

Lori Waters

Lori Waters

Animal Expert Extraordinaire! at The Litter Sitter, inc.
Lori Waters is the author and voice behind Thee Inside Poop as well as the owner and operator of The Litter Sitter, a local dog walking and pet sitting company in Miami Beach, FL. When she's not busy blogging and taking care of clients' pets you can find her running around with her german shepherd Zoey or having in-depth conversations with her two fur balls, Michi and Oakley!
Lori Waters

COLLARSCollars! They come in all different shapes, sizes, styles, colors and then some! Every pet, especially dogs, needs a collar mainly because it holds our furry friends’ ID tag as well as their Rabies tag which is usually required in most if not all states. Your dog also needs a collar so you can attach their leash and keep them under control but with so many different types of collars out on the market these days it’s hard to know which one is the best fit for your pup!

So here’s my list of the different types collars out on the market today:

 

Flat Collars

Flat collars are your day-to-day collars. These are the collars you can get in different colors, patterns and designs and can either be the buckle type or quick release. The difference between these two types of collars is the way they are secured onto your dog, whether it’s buckled on snapped into place around their neck. Some people prefer to have  quick release collars in case their pet gets tangled or caught in something that way they can easily break away whereas others prefer the buckle ones. It really just depends on the pet parents preference and what’s most comfortable for your pet. If you have a dog that pulls a lot this may not be the best collar for them.

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Martingale Collars

Also known as greyhound collars these are specifically for those pets that are escape artists and like to back out of their collars. The way it works is that it tightens at the tug of the leash but doesn’t completely close and/or choke the pet, hence the reason why there is another loop of material.web_stellabmartingale

Choke Chain Collars (Chain Slip)

As the name would suggest these collars are designed to CHOKE your dog. Most people who use these types of collars use them for dogs who pull when walking. The theory behind these collars is when your dog pulls the collar tightens essentially “choking” the pet which in turn should make your dog stop pulling. This isn’t always the case, some dogs may not respond to this type of collar and may choke/strangle themselves to death or unconsciousness or if used for long periods of time may cause damage to the dogs trachea or esophagus (throat). This type of collar can be very dangerous and should only be used by someone who knows what they are doing i.e hiring a professional and experienced dog trainer.

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Prong/Pinch Collars

Prong or pinch collars are similar to choke collars with the addition of steel/metal prongs. The theory behind this collar is also similar to the choke collar in that when your dog pulls the collar tightens creating an uncomfortable sensation around the neck thus causing the dog to stop pulling. Again this doesn’t always work, some dogs may not respond to this type of collar and can instead be severely injured. This is another type of collar that should be used with caution and under the supervision of a trained professional.

I personally wouldn’t recommend choke or prong collars as they can be very dangerous if not used correctly. There are so many other types of collars out there that can get the job done that I just feel that these types are just unnecessary and inhumane.

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Electric Collar

These shock collars use an electrical current passing from the two contact points on the device to deliver a signal to your dog. This signal can range in intensity from mild, moderate to severe. A very controversial tool in the industry as many people consider this tool to be inhumane and can easily be manipulated as a form of abuse. Another collar that should also be used under the supervision of a trained professional. These types of collars are typically used in training and/or with dogs who are unruly and uncontrollable.

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Head Collar

Similar to horse halters, these collars are secured at the back of the skull and over the dogs muzzle. A great tool to use if your dog is the type that likes to pull during walks. I personally have used a head collar for my german shepherd and it worked great in the beginning but she didn’t tolerate it very well after the first few walks. So this would be great if your dog is ok with having things over their muzzle otherwise you may need to find something else that fits them more comfortably.

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 Harness

There are a variety of harnesses on the market these days, some of which attach at the front of the chest and others with the attachment on the back. Depending on your dog and how much pulling they do you can choose which one will work best for them. I find that for dogs that love to jump and lunge while walking using a harness with an attachment on the front works best, you can use their momentum to gain better control of them whereas with the harnesses  attached on the back it just encourages pulling even more and gives them better leverage to pull.

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A few things to think about before choosing a collar are:

– Is my dog a puller/lunger?

– Will my dog respond well to this type of collar?

– Will it be comfortable for my dog?

– Will this tool physically injure/harm my dog?

– Is my dog reactive on walks?

– Does my dog like to wander and sniff things?

 

Once you decide what kind of “walker” your dog is you can get a better sense of what collar would be best for them. You obviously wouldn’t want to put a choke collar on a dog that is a good walker as it would be unnecessary but then you wouldn’t want to put a flat collar on a dog who loves backing out of collars whenever he sees a squirrel or another dog during walks. The goal is to find a collar that works best not only for your pup but for you as well so that both of you can have an enjoyable walk every time!

Happy Walking!

 

 

The Truth About Anesthesia Free Dentals!

Lori Waters

Lori Waters

Animal Expert Extraordinaire! at The Litter Sitter, inc.
Lori Waters is the author and voice behind Thee Inside Poop as well as the owner and operator of The Litter Sitter, a local dog walking and pet sitting company in Miami Beach, FL. When she's not busy blogging and taking care of clients' pets you can find her running around with her german shepherd Zoey or having in-depth conversations with her two fur balls, Michi and Oakley!
Lori Waters

 

Anesthesia

Nonprofessional dental scaling (NPDS), also known as anesthesia free dentistry (AFD), has been increasing in popularity in the last few years  because of client’s concerns of the perceived risks of anesthesia as well as it’s cost. The issue here, as with many things, is the lack of information/knowledge that pet parents have. I don’t think they truly understand what goes on when your pet has a NPDS.

The #1 thing we need to understand about NPDS is that it is simply a cosmetic procedure, meaning that it only deals with the appearance of the pet’s teeth. 

Now that that’s out of the way let’s go over a few things that you don’t get with a NPDS.

You don’t get:

1. Thorough View of The Pet’s Mouth

I don’t know if you’ve ever tried brushing your pet’s teeth but they’re not the most tolerant fur balls when it comes to having someone stick a foreign object in their mouth and then proceed to rub it back and forth against their teeth, not to mention the fact that the toothpaste doesn’t even taste good! And with cats this task is even worse if not impossible. Now imagine trying to open their mouths to inspect their teeth and do a little poking around more specifically below the gum line with a really sharp metal object with no local anesthetic or anesthesia… painful right? Extremely. This kind of probing should not be done on an animal that is wide awake. It’s stressful and very, very painful. Don’t believe me? Next time you go visit your dentist make sure to opt for an anesthesia-free procedure and then tell me all about it.

It is virtually impossible to get a clear view of every single tooth within a pet’s mouth when they are wide awake. They’re moving, fidgeting and nervous.  It’s very challenging to say the least and also dangerous especially when you’re handling sharp, high-powered tools like the ones used during these procedures and if your pet just so happens to need a few teeth extracted then this is definitely out of the question!

2. Radiographs 

Radiographs also tie into the getting-a-thorough-view-of-your-pets-mouth in that they give you an overall view of what is really going on not only underneath the surface of the gum line but also above it as well. With radiographs you can see any and everything and get a more in-depth look at issues that may be occurring for example: fractured teeth, tumors, gingival hyperplasia, discolored teeth, areas of tooth resorption, periodontal disease, bone loss, abscesses, etc; because although your pet may have pretty decent looking teeth that doesn’t necessarily mean that your pet may be in the clear. Issues like gingivitis, tartar and plaque aren’t things that are readily addressed by a NPDS being that their job is simply cosmetic and they’re only concerned about scraping and polishing the teeth.

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The above image shows significant bone loss due to periodontal disease

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The black spaces shown above indicate severe bone loss due to periodontal disease (these areas should be white)

3. Pain management

This is the single most important aspect of this whole procedure! Yes you want your pet to have healthy and clean teeth but do you really want to accomplish that at your pets expense? I’m sure you’ve been to the dentist before and know how painful it can be to have someone probe your gums and do any kind of work to your mouth but you usually have some sort of local anesthetic on board working in your favor. In the majority of these pets’ cases they don’t have that luxury. Most places use some sort of “calming agent” (Rescue Remedy/5 Flower Essence) to keep their patients calm and immobile, if that’s even possible, but that does nothing to manage their pain. So chances are they’re in pain during the procedure and they’re in pain after it.

Now you tell me which sounds like a better outcome, NPDS or traditional dental procedure?

 

For Our Concerned Pet Parents 

There are always risks involved when pets are put under and pet parents have every right to be concerned but it is important to note that veterinarians who practice routine dentals practice at an advanced level of care and are usually well equipped to safely monitor patients and handle any situations that may arise. They also provide premedications and nerve blocks thus allowing patients to be under a light general anesthesia which allows maximized cardiac output, tissue perfusion and maintained blood pressure.

As a side note, quoted from AVDC (American Veterinary Dental College):

“In the United States and Canada, only licensed veterinarians can practice veterinary medicine. Veterinary medicine includes veterinary surgery, medicine and dentistry. Anyone providing dental services other than a licensed veterinarian, or a supervised and trained veterinary technician, is practicing veterinary medicine without a license and is subject to criminal charges.” 

What are your thoughts on NPDS? Have you ever taken your pet to get a NPDS?

Top 3 Vaccine Myths

Lori Waters

Lori Waters

Animal Expert Extraordinaire! at The Litter Sitter, inc.
Lori Waters is the author and voice behind Thee Inside Poop as well as the owner and operator of The Litter Sitter, a local dog walking and pet sitting company in Miami Beach, FL. When she's not busy blogging and taking care of clients' pets you can find her running around with her german shepherd Zoey or having in-depth conversations with her two fur balls, Michi and Oakley!
Lori Waters

vaccine

1. Pets must be vaccinated every single year.

FALSE! Contrary to popular belief this is not true!

Once you’ve gone through the process of getting your pet their puppy/kitty vaccines or their initial vaccines then there’s no need for them to be re-vaccinated every year afterwards. There is a wealth of research that supports this and even goes as far as stating that just a single vaccination  can provide years if not lifelong immunity. There are some who believe that continuously vaccinating your pet will provide a stronger and/or longer immunity and that is also not the case. Constant vaccination instead tacks on the immune system essentially making it weaker and more susceptible to a host of problems such as allergies, autoimmune diseases, arthritis, tumors, seizures and more. You can go as far as saying that pet vaccines are virtually the same as human vaccines in the sense that humans don’t need to be re-vaccinated every year either so then why would your pet?

Also, it isn’t recommended to vaccinate for Boredetella, Corona, Lepto and Lyme disease unless these diseases are endemic locally or at a specific kennel.

 

2. Vaccines are extremely safe.

FALSE!

Vaccines are not extremely safe and there is always a risk when it comes to vaccinating your pet. You never know if your pet may have some sort of allergic reaction to the vaccine or worse if he/she may die because of them. As stated above your pet may become more susceptible to a plethora of problems if their immune system is constantly being bombarded.

This is especially important to note if you booster your pet regularly whether it be every 6 months or 1-3 years.

 

3. My veterinarian knows best.

FALSE! 

Your veterinarian may not always knows what’s best for your pet. One of two things may come into play in regards to your pets vaccines: 1) your vet may not be up to date on the literature and may not know the many risks of vaccinating so frequently or 2) your vet may be up to date with the literature but may still choose to vaccinate frequently.

Some veterinarians out there are very much “old school” so they don’t always follow up with changing trends and schedules when it pertains to certain aspects of their practice one of those being vaccines. Whereas other veterinarians do their research and know what is up to date but yet choose not to change their practices. (These are the ones you should be most concerned about.)

One important thing to note about vaccines and the pharmaceutical industry is that veterinarians (and in turn the pharmaceutical companies) make a significant amount of revenue from vaccinating pets every single year. Quoted from an article from Dr.Karen Becker over at Mercola Healthy Pets:

“Estimates are that removing the one-year rabies vaccination/office visit for dogs alone could reduce a veterinarian’s income from $87,000 to $25,000. And this example involves just one variety of one vaccine, and only dogs.”

With that in mind now you can see how this can very lucrative to a practice that chooses to do it.

How often do you vaccinate your pet? Or do you not vaccinate them at all?

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